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My wife drives a 2002 Hyundai Elantra GT. Recently the car started idling very rough with rpm jumps back and forth from 1500 to 2500 rpm. The check engine light came on and threw a code for the IAC. I also notice a clicking sound coming from the engine and I can see sparks arching at the coil/plug wire. The arching is happening at the coil with the numbers 1 & 4.

The car is difficult to drive. It shakes and surges and isn't pleasant to drive at all. These issues started happening very recently. The car ran great up until now. We've stopped driving it for the time being until we solve the problem.

We had the car serviced a few years ago and they changed the IAC and mentioned something about a gray wire that we should watch out for.

I'm not really sure what the issue is. I don't know if it is the spark plugs, wires, or coil. Or it could be the IAC or something else. I'm comfortable working on the car myself, but I would rather not try fixing many things if it is just one thing actually wrong.

So far, the only thing I've tried is to spray some carb cleaner into the throttle body towards the IAC in hopes that it would clean it and solve my problems.

I appreciate any suggestions. Thanks!

EDIT: Could someone describe or show me where the IAC is located. I want to try remove and clean it, but I'm unsure of exactly where it it. I know it is somewhere on the throttle body or intake manifold, but I'm not sure exatly what I'm looking for. Thanks!
 

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Update

I worked on the car last night. I changed the spark plugs and plug wires and the car no longer has any arching going on. The engine also runs much smoother. It had quite a shake to it before I changed the plugs & wires.

Also, I removed the IAC and tried cleaning it out with carb cleaner. After re-installing it, it seemed to make an improvement, but the problem is still there. The car idles at around 1500 rpm and the rpms fluxuate up and down about 100 rpm rythmically.

I'm wondering now if I might have a vacuum leak somewhere. I can hear a faint hissing or sucking sound under the hood with the car running.

The issue still isn't fixed, but the car is much more driveable now. I appreaciate any suggestions.

Thanks.
 

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Find the intake leak. Get an old Windex spray bottle and fill it with water. Spray the water in the area where you have the hissing noise. You should be able to pinpoint the location when the water gets sucked into the leak and varies idle speed.
 

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QUOTE (jsinton @ Oct 15 2010, 12:08 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=363698
Find the intake leak. Get an old Windex spray bottle and fill it with water. Spray the water in the area where you have the hissing noise. You should be able to pinpoint the location when the water gets sucked into the leak and varies idle speed.
Thanks for the information. I located the leak to be the IAC. I used carb cleaner instead of water and listened for the RPMs to change. When I removed the IAC to clean it, there was no gasket present, only some RTV sealant. When I put everything back together, apparently the seal was broken. I picked up some RTV sealant to make a new seal.

My only problem now is with the top bolt on the IAC. There isn't enough room around the bolt to fit a socket over the bolt head due to the IAC body. The phillips drive of the bolt was already close to being stripped when I started working on it, and unfortunately it stripped when I tried removing it this evening. So, right now I'm stuck with a bolt that I cannot remove. I'm going to try and get a 10mm wrench and see if that will work for me. If I can get the bolt out, I can switch it with the one on the bottom that is not stripped at all. I don't have any problem getting a socket over the bolt head at the bottom of the IAC. It doesn't matter if the phillips drive is stripped on that bolt. If I can't get it off with a wrench, I might try and use an extractor. My other thought was to use a dremel tool to grind a slit in the bolt and use a large flat head to remove it.

I'm stuck for now until I can get the top bolt out. Hopefully once I get that situation squared away though, I can get it back together with the RTV sealant and be good to go. Well, except for the slipping clutch. That's the next project.
 

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QUOTE (markag @ Oct 21 2010, 12:06 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=365057
Thanks for the information. I located the leak to be the IAC. I used carb cleaner instead of water and listened for the RPMs to change. When I removed the IAC to clean it, there was no gasket present, only some RTV sealant. When I put everything back together, apparently the seal was broken. I picked up some RTV sealant to make a new seal.
Buy the proper gasket, it should be in stock if your local Hyundai franchise has any parts..

My only problem now is with the top bolt on the IAC. There isn't enough room around the bolt to fit a socket over the bolt head due to the IAC body.
Like that on all of them..

The phillips drive of the bolt was already close to being stripped when I started working on it, and unfortunately it stripped when I tried removing it this evening. So, right now I'm stuck with a bolt that I cannot remove. I'm going to try and get a 10mm wrench and see if that will work for me. If I can get the bolt out, I can switch it with the one on the bottom that is not stripped at all. I don't have any problem getting a socket over the bolt head at the bottom of the IAC. It doesn't matter if the phillips drive is stripped on that bolt. If I can't get it off with a wrench, I might try and use an extractor. My other thought was to use a dremel tool to grind a slit in the bolt and use a large flat head to remove it.
Go to LOWES and hit the blue drawers for a socket head cap screw.. take 1 of your current screws for demo. then all you need is proper allen wrench

I'm stuck for now until I can get the top bolt out. Hopefully once I get that situation squared away though, I can get it back together with the RTV sealant and be good to go. Well, except for the slipping clutch. That's the next project.
NO RTV !
 

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I appreciate the advice. I definatly will look at getting a replacement bolt.

Just curious but is there any reason why you say not to use the RTV gasket maker? The "local" hyundai dealership is roughly 40 minutes away from where I live. I'd like to be able to get the car up and running so that my wife isn't stranded at home any more while I'm at work. It appears that whomever worked on the car before us used it. I have a tip that will let me put down a thin bead of RTV and not a glob. I'm just curious to hear why not to use RTV.
 

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Fyi diy

Sorry to bring this back from the dead, but I hope this information will be useful to someone in the future. If you don't want to purchase or do not have the time to buy new gaskets, there is an alternative that is cost effective and simple. I always tend to keep some manila folders (Office filing folder) lying around for this reason.

Simply place the part (throttle body, IAC etc. cleaned/no grease or oil) which needs a gasket, on top of a manilla folder and trace the outline of the part. The inside can be a bit trickier depending on what it is, this just takes some practice or a few tries the first time out. After you have it fine tuned and have holes for ports valves etc all shaped out and cut, place the improvised gasket on a clean piece of paper or surface that can be cleaned easily or disposed of (the wife's parchment paper works very well :).) Then simply take the appropriate gasket maker RTV, High temp etc. and coat all surfaces of the gasket with a fairly thin layer of sealant. Voila! A perfectly fitting gasket that has an airtight seal.

I have used this method for years on my dirt bike clutch cover and other gaskets. Works very well with oil, TB and vacuum applications. I just wouldn't use it on a post carb/injector setup as the fuel will probably degrade the material.
 

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Sorry to bring this back from the dead, but I hope this information will be useful to someone in the future. If you don't want to purchase or do not have the time to buy new gaskets, there is an alternative that is cost effective and simple. I always tend to keep some manila folders (Office filing folder) lying around for this reason.

Simply place the part (throttle body, IAC etc. cleaned/no grease or oil) which needs a gasket, on top of a manilla folder and trace the outline of the part. The inside can be a bit trickier depending on what it is, this just takes some practice or a few tries the first time out. After you have it fine tuned and have holes for ports valves etc all shaped out and cut, place the improvised gasket on a clean piece of paper or surface that can be cleaned easily or disposed of (the wife's parchment paper works very well :).) Then simply take the appropriate gasket maker RTV, High temp etc. and coat all surfaces of the gasket with a fairly thin layer of sealant. Voila! A perfectly fitting gasket that has an airtight seal.

I have used this method for years on my dirt bike clutch cover and other gaskets. Works very well with oil, TB and vacuum applications. I just wouldn't use it on a post carb/injector setup as the fuel will probably degrade the material.
And here I thought I was the only one who made gaskets this way! :D
 
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