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My son has a 2000 Elanta and the transmission has weird intermittent problems. We will be going down the freeway at 70, 3000 rpm's, also happens at slower speeds, and suddenly it will shift into a lower gear i assume, the rpms will jump to 4,500 and will stay there. Nothing will help except coming to a complete stop, turn the car off and restart it. There is no pattern to this, will run fine for a while then for no reason, do it again. We took it to a trany shop and naturally they said it needed a new transmission. I'm not convinced its something simple like a sensor. Nothing shows up on a scan with regards to the drive line or trany. The car had 95k when we bought it and about 105 now. This vehicle has had continue problems, mostly with sensors. Doing a complete brake job on it now and to my "delight" discovered you cannot change the front rotor without tearing apart have of the front suspension! I've change a ton of brakes and rotors on cars from 1990 and newer and cannot believe how backwards this company is. I see they changed that in the 2001 year, only took them 10 years to figure it out. Anyway I digress, does anyone have any suggestions, short of replacing the trany, on other things I can look for. Is it possible some previous owner put non Hyundai fluid in it, thinking it was a normal car. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Rick
 

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First of all, did you change the trans fluid? That's the first thing to do. I'll bet it's heat related too. Consider adding a trans cooler.

Who told you the rotors can't be removed? That's wrong. I just did mine a couple weeks ago. They come right off.
 

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Well as far as the front rotors, they may have changed mid year because the studs for the wheel nuts are pressed into the rotor. They would come off with the rotor unlike "normal" where the studs stay on the hub assembly and the rotor comes off the studs. The trany thing can happen within 1-2 minutes of driving the car. Live in Michigan and it did this when the temp was 20 degrees out, so I'm thinking maybe its not a heat problem, but who knows. I hate to spend the time and money to change the fluid if that is not a probable cause. I know its cheaper than a new one but...
 

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My 97 Elantra has "captive rotors." This means that the rotors are sandwiched between the knuckle and the hub (which is pressed in to the bearing inside the knuckle). Changing the rotors literally requires tearing the hub and bearing apart. This was changed in later years of the same 2G generation. The only explanation for this design is that the rotors were expected to outlast the lifetime of the car.

The 2G Elantra seems to have been plagued by various transmission issues, some more serious than others. Previously on this forum I addressed an issue affecting my 97, which was the subject of Technical Service Bulletins (and a recall) from the manufacturer. Fortunately, some very high quality and highly relevant information on these issues is available at www.hmaservice.com. Go there, get a free subscription, and do a "detailed search" on the word "transaxle" for your car.

The first step in any trans diagnostic is to replace the transmission fluid with the correct (SPIII) Hyundai fluid to the correct level (measure with the engine running, lever in Neutral). For a quick change, drain through the plug and refill. If you have time to be more thorough remove the pan and replace the filter, and follow a flushing procedure.

Probably your next step is to check for proper ground. Follow the procedure outlined here:
http://hmaservice.com/local_viewer/default...p;title_num=331

After that the next thing will be an adjustment of the kick-down servo. The procedure is also listed on hmaservice. It is easily done if you remove the air filter box.

You will also find diagnostics and repair procedures listed for the pulse generator, the range switch, the input and output speed sensor, the trans oil temperature sensor, the solenoids, and the Trans Control Unit (TCU). One thing that might help you to narrow things down is to check for stored error codes in the computer. You did not mention if your Check Engine Light was illuminated.

As you can see there are many things that can be done BEFORE you replace the transmission. This should only be done as a last resort after you are confident that other measures cannot solve your problem.

Good luck.
 
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