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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I have a 2000 Hyundai accent, manual 5 speed, and an engine that says SOHC 12V on the top, not 100% sure what that means.

Its problem is that sometimes ill try to start it and nothing happens.
At first, I thought it was the starter relay so I replaced that. That fixed it for a while.

One day it happened again and the solution was to use my less worn out spare key, crazy right? That worked for a while but now not even that spare key works.

It won't jumpstart, but it being a manual does allow me to roll start it, which is a lot more fun than I anticipated, but requires an extra person for safety reasons.

at one point someone told me that it could be the starter solenoid and that I could test it using a "remote start kit".

What do you all think?
 

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I have had something similar
The engine would sometimes not even crank
Other times, it would start .. no problem

My solution was to clean up the battery terminals and clean up the battery ground at the chassis
Also for good measure .. changed the ignition switch.

My suggestion would be to clean the battery terminals with wire brush
And clean the battery grounding point at the chassis.
If necessary to also clean the ignition wire going to the starter solenoid
If nothing else this will at least elimination corrosion at the battery

Testing the starter solenoid with a remote starter kit
It is much like using a wire. Hook one end to the starter solenoid.
The other end is then touched to battery positive
It should crank engine if everything is okay
The remote starter kit would have a big switch in the middle of the wire
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I never encountered any problems with other electrical systems in the car such as the radio, lights, or the bell, but I will try what you have suggested, thank you!

What thickness of wire should I use for testing the solenoid? I assume it should also be insulated well.
 

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Hi Everyone,

I have a 2000 Hyundai accent, manual 5 speed, and an engine that says SOHC 12V on the top, not 100% sure what that means.



Single Overhead Cam, 12 valves (3 per cylinder)
 

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I never encountered any problems with other electrical systems in the car such as the radio, lights, or the bell, but I will try what you have suggested, thank you!

What thickness of wire should I use for testing the solenoid? I assume it should also be insulated well.
The amount of current needed to run a starter motor is much more than the current needed to run a radio or head lights or horn.
Depending upon the engine and starter motor, it can take 30 to 80 amps to crank an engine.
A radio may take 1 or 2 amp at most .. maybe if you got the speakers pumped up loud
 

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What thickness of wire should I use for testing the solenoid? I assume it should also be insulated well.
Before messing with the solenoid you might want to try a simple bypass test on the START relay.

Put the gearbox in neutral and switch the ignition on.
Remove the START relay from the fusebox and use a short link wire to bridge the two terminals on the relay socket on the fusebox as shown below.
If the engine now cranks you know your battery, starter/solenoid and the starter wiring is all good and your fault is with the part of the circuit that controls the START relay.

Do you need to press the clutch to start the engine on your car? If so and the bypass test works, the clutch switch would be the next thing to check.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Before messing with the solenoid you might want to try a simple bypass test on the START relay.

Put the gearbox in neutral and switch the ignition on.
Remove the START relay from the fusebox and use a short link wire to bridge the two terminals on the relay socket on the fusebox as shown below.
If the engine now cranks you know your battery, starter/solenoid and the starter wiring is all good and your fault is with the part of the circuit that controls the START relay.

Do you need to press the clutch to start the engine on your car? If so and the bypass test works, the clutch switch would be the next thing to check.
I tried using other relays in the fuse box that appeared to be identical, such as the fuel pump relay in order to test for a bad relay (which is how I figured out the starter relay shoud be replaced), as well as the radiator fan relay (also the radiator fan turns on for 60 sec or so after turning off the car, is that normal?). I believe I do need to push in the clutch, I will check that as well.
 

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I tried using other relays in the fuse box that appeared to be identical, such as the fuel pump relay in order to test for a bad relay
Just to be clear, the relay bypass test isn't used to test for a bad relay. It's used to determine what one of the relay circuits is at fault.

A relay has two separate circuits. There is the relay control circuit that is used to energize the relay (85 & 86 terminals) and there is the relay load circuit that passes current to the electrical consumer, the starter solenoid in this case (30 & 87 terminals). The bypass test links the 30 & 87 terminals on the relay socket to send current to the starter solenoid. If that makes the engine crank over you know the relay load circuit is good meaning the fault must be on the control circuit.
 

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The amount of current needed to run a starter motor is much more than the current needed to run a radio or head lights or horn.
Depending upon the engine and starter motor, it can take 30 to 80 amps to crank an engine.
A radio may take 1 or 2 amp at most .. maybe if you got the speakers pumped up loud
30 to 80 amps? The starter will draw much more than that. Maybe 80 amps without the plugs in it.
 

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I tried using other relays in the fuse box that appeared to be identical, such as the fuel pump relay in order to test for a bad relay (which is how I figured out the starter relay shoud be replaced), as well as the radiator fan relay (also the radiator fan turns on for 60 sec or so after turning off the car, is that normal?). I believe I do need to push in the clutch, I will check that as well.

Fan running after shut down is normal.
 

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Hi Everyone,

I have a 2000 Hyundai accent, manual 5 speed, and an engine that says SOHC 12V on the top, not 100% sure what that means.

Its problem is that sometimes ill try to start it and nothing happens.
At first, I thought it was the starter relay so I replaced that. That fixed it for a while.

One day it happened again and the solution was to use my less worn out spare key, crazy right? That worked for a while but now not even that spare key works.

It won't jumpstart, but it being a manual does allow me to roll start it, which is a lot more fun than I anticipated, but requires an extra person for safety reasons.

at one point someone told me that it could be the starter solenoid and that I could test it using a "remote start kit".

What do you all think?

I keep a long steel rod and hammer in my vehicle. If I find myself without starter engagement I will hit it with the bar and hammer and re try. If your brushes are worn the vibration will help them make contact. Replacement is imperative.
 

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30 to 80 amps? The starter will draw much more than that. Maybe 80 amps without the plugs in it.
I know some people know more and some less
And then there are those who want to show off what they know
Of course you have experience in working a shop/garage
Please don't over do the corrections

If you read clearly you will see where it says that it depends on the motor and the starter motor.
And the statement was to show that the current draw was much more than a stereo
I think I made my meaning clear enough

Also, the plugs don't necessarily take a lot of current since it is mostly high voltage caused by a collapsing electrical/magnetic field of the coil.

Fan running after shut down is normal.
Well, that depends upon the car. Not all cars do that.

I keep a long steel rod and hammer in my vehicle. If I find myself without starter engagement I will hit it with the bar and hammer and re try. If your brushes are worn the vibration will help them make contact. Replacement is imperative.
I'm sure that as a previous garage owner that you keep a lot of stuff in your vehicle that others don't


I bit the bullet and replaced the starter, this fixed the issue.
Thanks for the update
Much appreciated
 

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I know some people know more and some less
And then there are those who want to show off what they know
Of course you have experience in working a shop/garage
Please don't over do the corrections

If you read clearly you will see where it says that it depends on the motor and the starter motor.
And the statement was to show that the current draw was much more than a stereo
I think I made my meaning clear enough

Also, the plugs don't necessarily take a lot of current since it is mostly high voltage caused by a collapsing electrical/magnetic field of the coil.


Well, that depends upon the car. Not all cars do that.


I'm sure that as a previous garage owner that you keep a lot of stuff in your vehicle that others don't




Thanks for the update
Much appreciated

Spark plugs out equals low compression and easy crank for starter motor. I guess you didn't know what I meant by plugs out.



His car has fan after shutdown based on ECT.


The bar and hammer are to give an idea to help keep form getting stranded. People who are thinking can figure a simple way to do the same with their vehicle.



Also keep a rubber mallet to bang on fuel tank if the pump doesn't do the 2 second prime during key on. This may get you going long enough to get home or a place to replace the pump.



These are things most anyone can have in their vehicle to get out of a jam.



I don't like correcting but some things are for learning and not as a rebuke
 

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Spark plugs out equals low compression and easy crank for starter motor. I guess you didn't know what I meant by plugs out.
Yeah, not being a mechanic I don't do mechanic speak


His car has fan after shutdown based on ECT.
Just pointing out that not all cars do that.


The bar and hammer are to give an idea to help keep form getting stranded. People who are thinking can figure a simple way to do the same with their vehicle.
And some over do it and smack the heck out of the starter.
But, yeah, it is a way to test for bad brushes
Although it doesn't always work.
Thanks for the info



Also keep a rubber mallet to bang on fuel tank if the pump doesn't do the 2 second prime during key on. This may get you going long enough to get home or a place to replace the pump.
Thanks for the info



These are things most anyone can have in their vehicle to get out of a jam.
I don't like correcting but some things are for learning and not as a rebuke
Still, some motors and their starting motors don't always need to take more than 80 amps to crank even with the "plugs in".
Yes, there are some that may need more than 100 amps (V8 5.0liters or diesels)

For learning?? Seriously??
 
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