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I'm still considering a new 2018 Sonata and contemplating between the 2.4 naturally aspirated and the 2.0 Turbo engine. Here is why I am leaning toward the 2.4 instead of the turbo:

- The 2.0 Liter Turbo appears to only be about 1.25 to 1.5 seconds faster from 0-60 MPH than the 2.4 base engine.

- The competitor Manufacturers Turbo 4-cylinders are notably faster than the comparably sized Hyundai turbo. The Accord 2.0T for example is significantly quicker.

- The price of the turbo equipped trims are more expensive and they get worse MPG.

- I tend to keep cars for 10+ years, so the long-term reliability of the turbo engine scares me.


Thoughts/Insights?
 

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2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
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I'm still considering a new 2018 Sonata and contemplating between the 2.4 naturally aspirated and the 2.0 Turbo engine. Here is why I am leaning toward the 2.4 instead of the turbo:

- The 2.0 Liter Turbo appears to only be about 1.25 to 1.5 seconds faster from 0-60 MPH than the 2.4 base engine.

- The competitor Manufacturers Turbo 4-cylinders are notably faster than the comparably sized Hyundai turbo. The Accord 2.0T for example is significantly quicker.

- The price of the turbo equipped trims are more expensive and they get worse MPG.

- I tend to keep cars for 10+ years, so the long-term reliability of the turbo engine scares me.


Thoughts/Insights?
I don’t currently own a Sonata but having driven several Santa Fe’s this is a no-brainer. Absolutely would get the Turbo.

Fact is the Turbo will get better fuel mileage as well if you don’t stand on it constantly and when you have to get out of jams a turbo might save your life.

I drove a Santa Fe Turbo about 130 miles and it got 30 mpg. My previous non Turbo got about 24 mpg over 11,000 miles.

I currently do not have a turbo I either if my cars but that has to due to a big difference of weight.

I base that on my former Tucsons and Santa Fe’s.
 

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I went through the same decision process and bought the 2018 Limited/Ultimate. I also keep cars ten years and reliability is of prime importance. Most of my driving is to and from my golf course on city streets, so the 0 to 60 time didn't factor in to my decision. 2,800 miles in seven months with mpg at 27-28. A few 300 mile Interstate trips produced mpg in excess of 30.
 

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Forget the turbo if you plan on keeping the car as long as you suggested.
The turbo is a waste of money for what it is and not worth the extra headache when it comes to overall maintenance and reliability.
No forced induction car will ever be more reliable overall than a normally aspirated car.
 

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Fact is the Turbo will get better fuel mileage as well if you don’t stand on it constantly and when you have to get out of jams a turbo might save your life.

I drove a Santa Fe Turbo about 130 miles and it got 30 mpg. My previous non Turbo got about 24 mpg over 11,000 miles.
Depending on the time difference between the two cars, such a comparison might be flawed. At some point, in the second half of [20]00's-early 10's, there was a leap in the gas economy of the cars: the engines were made more economical, and the cars became lighter. (My understanding is that GDI introduced in Sonata in 2011 was in response to the higher-MPG demand.)

Forget the turbo if you plan on keeping the car as long as you suggested.
The turbo is a waste of money for what it is and not worth the extra headache when it comes to overall maintenance and reliability.
No forced induction car will ever be more reliable overall than a normally aspirated car.
That's a well known principle in engineering: a more complex system has more places where it can break.

An additional factor here is the issue with the Hyundai's GDI reliability. I don't know where that issue is more prevalent. Intuitively, I'd expect that on average, turbo engine would still be more prone to fail due to its higher complexity.
 

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Drive them both and make the decision.

I drove the 2.4 and would not have purchased a Sonata if the 2.0 was not available. For me hands down the 2.0T was the better driving, more spirited car and when driving any turbo if you are not into boost your gas mileage will be very good. I drive 130 miles a day commute most on freeway at 70-85 mph. I accelerate fast and often using the paddles to get to speed or to pass and the rest of the time is cruising at 70-805 mph , I av greater than 30 mpg always.

The 0-60 times are due to the transmission more than anything and they limit the boost off the line so the more realistic difference in driving is the 10-15 mph -60/80 mph that is where you will see a huge difference over the 2.4.

For reliability long term, yes any engine being pressured (turbo / supercharge) has more to maintain, break and the engine in general is pushed harder but if the design of the engine id to run a turbo the engineers have taken that into the design, also our cars as most turbos are pretty low amount of boost. This is why it is easy for a tuner to gain 80-150 hp/ 100 yq with some ecm tuning and a intake /exhaust (the 1.6 T in the Elantra already has aftermarket tunes available that take it to almost 300 hp) If you keep cars 10 yr are you a high mileage driver or is it 10 yr but under 100,000 miles, if that is the case your drivetrain (engine, turbo. trans etc) are covered by the 10/100,000 warranty so what to worry about?

Drive them both and make your choice.
 

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The 1.6Eco gives a blend of power and great fuel economy with 7 speed DCT. Doesn’t have quite the breadth of features, however.

I got the 2.4 is 2015 because no trim with 2.0T gave you a heated steering wheel, which was odd but true at the time.

Put a K&N air filter on the 2.4 and it helped quite a bit.
 

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That's a well known principle in engineering: a more complex system has more places where it can break. An additional factor here is the issue with the Hyundai's GDI reliability. I don't know where that issue is more prevalent. Intuitively said:
What do auto transmissions, A/C, power steering, fuel injection, power windows, ECM's, PCM's, BCM's, etc, etc, etc................. all have in common?

They add complexity. They all had their naysayers who all lost.

But they are all ubiquitous to the point that it's hard to buy anything without them.

Turbos are becoming ever so common.

Let's give the engineers some credit - they find ways.
 

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While it is true that turbo charged engines are quite reliable in things like long haul big rigs, the same cannot be said for your average family car.
Hyundai cut corners on their turbo design and those shortcomings with rear their ugly head in terms of long term reliability.
Power windows have been a staple in cars for around 30 years with the earliest ones arriving in the 50's and 60's so there has been plenty of time to work out the bugs.
While the turbo has not been a staple in cars except for the last 5 years or so.
Hyundai did not design their turbo setup with longevity in mind.
 

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What do auto transmissions, A/C, power steering, fuel injection, power windows, ECM's, PCM's, BCM's, etc, etc, etc................. all have in common?

They add complexity. They all had their naysayers who all lost.

But they are all ubiquitous to the point that it's hard to buy anything without them.

Turbos are becoming ever so common.

Let's give the engineers some credit - they find ways.
So, what's your point? That more complex systems do not break more often? That's not correct!
That more complex features became standard? - Yes. But they do break.

From the features you've listed, in the past 5-7 years, I had the following repairs: A/C, power windows, CVT (repeated major problems).
Other repairs were limited to CV-joints and one water pump leak.

Fuel injection, - we all know about Theta II GDI failures. PCM/BCM, - there have been several recalls for Sonatas.

Even for the feature that is 50-years old - power window - Nissan Altima 2001 had a recall, because the motors there were failing routinely.

Nobody says that turbo engines do not have their place. And if you want one, - have it, by all means. But if you are comparing reliability, - you cannot close your eyes to the reality.
 

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Guy I work with just got a 2018 SEL 2.4. I have a 17 2.0T Sport. We messed around a few times from 20 and 40mph and I pull him non stop. It's not even close, even when I give him a head start.

My aunt has a 2015 2.0T and has had no issues with it other than a window motor going out. And she's even been a few thousand late on oil changes.
 

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Honestly, I would go with a port injected engine if I could do it all over again... but I'm sure to get 10 years out of the 2.4... I hope ......
 

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The best way to determine what you want is to test them both out and see. In terms of reliability I never wanted to give the turbo engines a chance because I just never trusted them long term. The 2.4L in my ‘16 Sonata is plenty for me in terms of power but if you want something a little more then consider the turbo for sure. Hope this helps!
 
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(This is an old thread, comparatively...I wonder what he bought...?)

I always go for displacement. A turbo can give good power, but is another thing that can fuc...er..go bad. I have a 2.4 Scion and it is all the power I need.


Well, almost...;)

I did talk to a guy with a new Civic Si 1.5 turbo. He can tune it from the Infotainment system, and has had it up to 300HP and 300 torque.

I couldn't even imagine it! :eek:
 

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Forget the turbo if you plan on keeping the car as long as you suggested.
The turbo is a waste of money for what it is and not worth the extra headache when it comes to overall maintenance and reliability.
No forced induction car will ever be more reliable overall than a normally aspirated car.
precisely why we chose the 2.4L.
 

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precisely why we chose the 2.4L.

That's why they make various options for different people. Give me the Turbo with all options and I'm a happy camper, but others would be happy with the base car. Got a RX7 Turbo, we purchased new and now 30 years old, no problem with forced induction and the factory boost has been doubled for many, many, years.


One group loves the power, the other just wants basic transportation.
 

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I get mileage and performance when I want it...in the 2.4! Turbo is just another thing to go wrong (I was young once and had one). :nerd:
 

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While the turbo has not been a staple in cars except for the last 5 years or so.
Hyundai did not design their turbo setup with longevity in mind.
Your opinion.. but the engine design says otherwise.. Oil jets for piston cooling, Water/oil cooled turbo bearings, Engine oil cooler, Intercooler for lower intake air temps, ECM control over EGT temps, Etc.. These systems are all for longevity and reliability.. turbos have been around a long time.. early 60's for affordable passenger cars... Turbos have been In existence since the early 1900's.. smaller engine equals less weight and more packaging options..
twin scroll turbos have virtually no lag and work well with hyundai's low rpm torque curve... Well engineered system.. You're missing out...
 

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Turbos have only been in your mom and pop daily drivers and ecoboxes as of late.
When Chevy starts throwing turbos on their Cruz you know it's gone mainstream.
Sure, there have been diesel turbos in commercial applications that have been used for decades with hundreds of thousands of miles on them, but those systems are designed from the get go with longevity in mind and operate at much lower RPMs than your typical gas engine.
I have yet to see a family car with a pyrometer or factory turbo timer.


I drove Class A equipment for awhile so I am well aware of how you need to operate commercial equipment and the average consumer would never want to put up with those rules in their grocery getter.
 
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