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Read it again...this confirms exactly what the dealer GM said - by using 3rd party stuff (" defects attributed to the use of non genuine parts and accessories" , you risk your warranty protection. That would seem to be quite clear.
Sorry, no, exactly the opposite of what you are saying. What it means is that if there is a fault that Hyundai determines to be the result of non-authorised parts then the warranty will not apply to that fault.

It does not mean that the use of non-authorised parts voids any warranty in itself, which is what you have been saying.

Even if Hyundai make that determination, they have to justify it by demonstrating how the non-authorised part was responsible for the fault, or their decision can be challenged and would likely be overturned.

As said before, it is nonsense to suggest that fitting a new, non-OEM, radio would void the warranty on any part of the car. It is only if and when that non-OEM radio causes a fault elsewhere in the car that there is any risk to the warranty protection on that component, rendered faulty by the non-OEM radio. Realistically, that would not be a likely issue because other than such things as speakers, amplifier, cabling directly related to the entertainment system, and dashboard mounts and bezels, there isn't much that the non-OEM radio could damage.

Your supposition that the OP in this thread is doing a disservice to Hyundai owners by showing them how to replace their original entertainment systems is similarly nonsense.
 

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Sorry, no, exactly the opposite of what you are saying. What it means is that if there is a fault that Hyundai determines to be the result of non-authorised parts then the warranty will not apply to that fault.
Sorry No. What it says is that if you use a non-authorized component/part in your vehicle, Hyundai is not obligated to honor their warranty towards repairs.

Put simply - if you use something outside of authorized parts, don't expect Hyundai to provide repairs under warranty. You'll be disappointed.

Feel free to go into any Hyundai dealership in the U.S. and ask them "if I don't use an approved part in my vehicle, will you honor your warranty and make any repairs necessary under the warranty?". You'll get your "official answer". I already got mine.
 

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Sorry No...
I really don't know why I cared enough to try and explain this to you, so I'm not going to bother any longer. I have given you all the evidence needed to demonstrate that your statement to the OP as a result of fitting a non-OEM entertainment system in his vehicle that This would totally void our OEM warranty here was false.
 

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Great job OP.

I am really interested in this mod but seems like a lot of work. pfff


Funny discussion around warranty issues though - I will keep my comments to myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I really don't know why I cared enough to try and explain this to you, so I'm not going to bother any longer. I have given you all the evidence needed to demonstrate that your statement to the OP as a result of fitting a non-OEM entertainment system in his vehicle that This would totally void our OEM warranty here was false.
Trying to explain anything to him is like banging your head against the wall...
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Great job OP.

I am really interested in this mod but seems like a lot of work. pfff
Thanks, Wild9.. It was relatively easy if you've ever installed a car stereo before. Customizing the software to work the way I wanted was the most time consuming. Luckily android is fairly easy to work with and there are a lot of apps specific to android head units. I'm not suggesting it's for everyone, but I know there's a few who were considering an aftermarket alternative and hopefully they will benefit from this thread.
 

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Thanks, Wild9.. It was relatively easy if you've ever installed a car stereo before. Customizing the software to work the way I wanted was the most time consuming. Luckily android is fairly easy to work with and there are a lot of apps specific to android head units. I'm not suggesting it's for everyone, but I know there's a few who were considering an aftermarket alternative and hopefully they will benefit from this thread.
I am okay with electrical and car stereo in general but I am not sure what I would find behind the panels. I have a 2014 XL too and already had the head unit replaced under warranty some time back.

May be I will wait a bit and see. I really want spotify and google maps in there though.
 

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Trying to explain anything to him is like banging your head against the wall...
Fortunately...being rude & obtuse won't get most people to drink your phony Kool Aid on this topic. What's next...attach a new exhaust system with duct tape? :surprise:

Neither will watching your fellow vehicle owners fatefully install a whack-a-doodle, 3rd party, unstable-Android platform, Chinese component that clearly no dealer in their right mind would ever agree to support when the times comes for a defect to require a warranty repair. Those dealers will laugh you out of town.

But good luck with your unit. People can certainly make their own mistakes.

Hopefully nobody else blindly tries to put this thing in their SUV, only to watch things go down the porcelain receptacle.

Luckily, most people would avoid this kind of snake-oil solution.

Happy tinkering. I'll waive to you with a smile when you're sitting on the road side some day with that unit installed.
 

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Sorry No. What it says is that if you use a non-authorized component/part in your vehicle, Hyundai is not obligated to honor their warranty towards repairs.

Put simply - if you use something outside of authorized parts, don't expect Hyundai to provide repairs under warranty. You'll be disappointed.

Feel free to go into any Hyundai dealership in the U.S. and ask them "if I don't use an approved part in my vehicle, will you honor your warranty and make any repairs necessary under the warranty?". You'll get your "official answer". I already got mine.

already been there and done that.


The dealership informed me that *if* the after-market part was found to be the issue I'd be on the hook for the $130 "diagnostic" fee, plus the part/labor for the item. Since I was confident that an aftermarket light bulb (LED) could not have destroyed the sunshade motor, I authorized the "investigation/diagnostic".


Sure enough, nothing to do with the sunshade, which was replaced under warranty and the diagnostic charge/fee was removed.
 

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Fortunately...being rude & obtuse won't get most people to drink your phony Kool Aid on this topic. What's next...attach a new exhaust system with duct tape? :surprise:

Neither will watching your fellow vehicle owners fatefully install a whack-a-doodle, 3rd party, unstable-Android platform, Chinese component that clearly no dealer in their right mind would ever agree to support when the times comes for a defect to require a warranty repair. Those dealers will laugh you out of town.

But good luck with your unit. People can certainly make their own mistakes.

Hopefully nobody else blindly tries to put this thing in their SUV, only to watch things go down the porcelain receptacle.

Luckily, most people would avoid this kind of snake-oil solution.

Happy tinkering. I'll waive to you with a smile when you're sitting on the road side some day with that unit installed.

You of all people have no room to talk about insulting/rude/etc.
Someone posted they were going to get a Subaru and you let loose with a bunch of insults and rude comments and now you try to take the moral highground on this?
 

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For anyone reading this thread and considering not replacing a poor quality or poorly functioning entertainment system as a result of some of the comments posted in this thread, here is a brief and readable explanation of the protections provided by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act 1975 (Federal law in the U.S.)

https://apb-law.com/understanding-magnuson-moss-act-relates-aftermarket-car-parts/

Amongst other things it makes clear:
According to the Magnuson-Moss Act, a vehicle manufacturer cannot automatically cancel your warranty just because you’ve installed aftermarket car parts. This is an illegal practice. That said, if your aftermarket part somehow causes or contributes to a failure in your vehicle, the dealer may be able to deny your warranty claim—as long as they can prove the connection. In these cases, the burden of proof is entirely on the dealership.
It also provides an example of how this warranty protection works in practice.

Whilst that brief document is published on the internet, and one internet source is not necessarily any more reliable than one person posting thoughts on a forum, the above document was authored by a national law firm with an interest in enforcing warranty protections.

Meanwhile a specialist turning shop that appears to know its business pretty well posts a similar summary of the law here:
https://www.racereadyfab.com/blogs/news/does-it-void-my-warranty-magnuson-moss-act
 

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For anyone reading this thread and considering not replacing a poor quality or poorly functioning entertainment system as a result of some of the comments posted in this thread, here is a brief and readable explanation of the protections provided by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act 1975 (Federal law in the U.S.)
OK - let's pit nicks then.

A most critical element of that legislation (which has been amended several times since originally implemented 44 years ago), includes the clarification that accepting 3rd party services and products applies to warranty service and maintenance (only) - NOT BASE COMPONENTS of a product (like the main navigational Head unit).

Changing your oil or transmission fluids by Jiffy Lube, replacing some light bulbs, or installing some side window shades would be viewed entirely different under warranty support than the most significant electronic core unit of the vehicle. There are also some monetary limits regarding acceptable 3rd party substitutions for warranty repairs in the more current regulatory updates.

This portion is key: "If your aftermarket part somehow causes or contributes to a failure in your vehicle, the dealer may be able to deny your warranty claim—as long as they can prove the connection."

The devils in the details (and regulatory updates since 1975).
 

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Discussion Starter #33
This portion is key: "If your aftermarket part somehow causes or contributes to a failure in your vehicle, the dealer may be able to deny your warranty claim—as long as they can prove the connection."
I think we can all agree that this statement is true... Your interpretation of what is meant by it, however, is wrong..

"as long as they can prove the connection": My head unit has no bearing on the vehicles drive-train and would not be considered a contributing factor if my transmission were to overheat or brake lines were to fail.

:beathorse:
 

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OK - let's pit nicks then.
I have no interest in discussing this with you further at all. I posted the Magnuson-Moss summaries (many of which can be found online, from reputable sources) for those who were interested in understanding how US warranty protections work in relation to after-market work. These people know what they are talking about.

Note that the summary from the law firm is dated July 20, 2017. Law firms know how to track legislative and regulatory changes, where applicable. The second is dated March 1, 2018, from a professional after-market specialist. Vested interest, definitely, but hardly likely to open themselves up to a multitude of law suits for giving bad advice for their customers to follow.
 

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I have no interest in discussing this with you further at all. I posted the Magnuson-Moss summaries (many of which can be found online, from reputable sources) for those who were interested in understanding how US warranty protections work in relation to after-market work. These people know what they are talking about.
Great!

The legal compliance staff at my company that deals with this topic are also quite well informed, including the details on all the amendments since 1975, as well as case law where the regulation had consumer challenges based on field cases.
 

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This plugnplay chicom sourced headunits have been around for years. And, they change their name frequently enough after too many fail.
I would keep the OE headunit boxed up for the inevitable failure.

Any vehicle with radio integrated with HVAC and too many other systems is a vehicle I will never buy. din and doubledin are audio standards. Maybe the automakers will learn when no one buys their new car techno junkmobiles.

I give credit to the chicom companies for developing options. Alpine, Pioneer, Kenwood, Sony... are silent as owners wait for adapters.
 

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This would totally void our OEM warranty here.

We have the factory 10-year 100,000 mile manufacturer warranty plus dealer doubling to 20-year 200,000 file warranty.

It would also eliminate the free 3-year Blue Link services on our SFS 2.0T Ultimate.

Congrats on your gutting your head system, but no thanks.
Our warranty covers the HU??
 
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