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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I just bought a 2007 and I have to do some work on it. I am replacing all the suspension parts and brakes. The dealer suggested changing the timing belt - and then I get into it. There's tensioners, and pulleys and the water pump, etc, etc.

I wouldn't normally expect to be changing any of this at this mileage but I can see that it would be worth making sure the belt is in good shape for our next 4,000 mile road trip!

Water pump?? It obviously works and there is a possibility that a replacement could fail in the first couple of thousand miles.

I wouldn't expect the pulleys etc to need replacing...

My guess is this vehicle was driven by a farmer's wife - baby seat marks, NO stamps in the maintenance book - farmers find it easier to service themselves (even when it's free). Signs of travel on a gravel road but the paint doesn't show it (drove slow - baby on board?) All suspension bushings are worn out.

Any advice would be helpful
 

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At 120,000mile=200Kkm. timing belt if never change, will break anytime now. Wonder how it can last that long.
General practice is to replace the water pump at same time as that area is already opened. Buy an oem part if you are in doubt of aftermarkets.
Above is a laboor intensive job, 4-5 labor hour, that is why doing the water pump together. It will be at least $600 by individual garage.
Hope you got the car at dirt cheap. With other repairs such as suspension, distributor, spark plugs. plug wire, tires, battery, shocks on lot of dirt road trips, cat converter, just to name a few, if never replace will sure at their end of life. $3K is easy.
GL>
 

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Pull upper cover on timing belt and see if it says Hyundai; if so it's original and replacing it will be biggest priority.

Normally at second belt change of 200k kilometres , water pump and idler and tensioner bearings are replaced, generally.

I would do all fluids, transmission and differentials since it is cheap maint in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, that's very helpful.

It just occurred to me that I should do the timing belt before I put the right front strut back!

This car's pretty clean underneath for the miles it's done, so this has gone well so for (RH Front). For anyone following this, it looks like the swaybar link would be almost impossible to remove without removing the control arm, so needs to be replaced now - the left one will be even more fun I think!

And I am not regretting paying the extra for complete arms rather than just bushings. This isn't like my old Chevys or my 1993 Merc. The material doesn't look like it would stand up to the same amount of abuse and that front bushing has to be in there pretty tight. So without the right tools and better knowledge, this is the way for me.

Brake fluid has 4% moisture so I was planning on pumping thru' a pint or two. Not sure how to "flush" the brake fluid and don't think I have the tools - might mess up the ESC & ABS?

The dealer also recommended trannie flush, transfer case service and rear diff service. Not sure how you "service" these.

Yes, there is a maintenance schedule in my owner's manual and it looks like the tech just copied it onto my estimate! So not quite the info I was asking for!

And yes my total estimate for this work from the dealer was $4,735! That's why I'm here and VERY thankful for all your help. But also I bought the car at auction for $4,500 so I think I will be happy with the result as long as the drivetrain is OK
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Timing Belt

OK, so I guess I'm doing the belt and water pump.

Realistically, what else should actually need replacing. The Hydraulic tensioner is suggested ($150). Some belt kits come with rollers (but not bearings!?)

Tensioner pulley, idler pulley.... I haven't got it apart yet so it's not making a lot of sense. It's not really that old a vehicle. Should i expect these parts to be worn out?
 

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It takes over two hours to pull the crank pulley and covers and see the idler and tensioner parts.

Most of the timing belt kits come with the extra parts.

They are pulleys that have a bearing in the centre, if they seize the timing belt breaks and engine is toast.

It's why all the newer engines are chain driven now.
 

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It takes over two hours to pull the crank pulley and covers and see the idler and tensioner parts.

Most of the timing belt kits come with the extra parts.

They are pulleys that have a bearing in the centre, if they seize the timing belt breaks and engine is toast.

It's why all the newer engines are chain driven now.

Start with removing the 21mm crank pulley bolt; impact is best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Santa06,

Thanks for that - for some reason I didn't see your post till today and I have been looking all the time. Maybe I had to log out or something??

I just got as far as the water pump. It's quite a journey.

Problems...

1) Yeah, my crappy impact wrench did it finally. Even with a 3/8 drive 12 point socket! (doesn't even have the power to break that!)

2) best to cut the belt and even remove it before you try to remove the pulley (harmonic balancer)

3) someone dry-fitted the pulley - so it's "welded" to the main sprocket. The "spring pin" that locates the two isn't really "spring" steel! Someone has tried to punch the two pieces apart using the pin. Now it's a RIVET!! Once you get them out and apart you can file off the burrs and it will still work.

4) chips on the pulley mean that they also tried a puller - now I know that they didn't succeed in replacing the belt. I get a new pulley also - no point in having a harmonic balancer that isn't balanced!!

5) Now for that beastly engine mount. the 4th screw is on top, hard to find, smaller (which doesn't make sense) and you can only really get at it when you have removed the top half.

6) OBTW, if you don't have the engine raised enough you will have difficulty removing the top half. Jack up or down till the bolts are centred in their holes - then removal is easy.

7) there is actually a 5th bolt on the lower half - some idiot decided to bolt the oil dip stick to it!! Have fun with that!

8) A REAL PROBLEM and I really need help with this...
I got the hydraulic tensioner out but the lower bolt was lose. Not surprising since the bolt hole is much larger than the bolt!!

I should clarify - the bolt (say 8mm) is about 3" long, fits the hole in the tensioner and the thread in the block, but the first 1 1/2" of the hole is more like 10mm. So the bolt rattles around until it's tightened down. Further there is no pin or other locating device for the tensioner so it obviously will tend to come lose. And the only pressure on this bolt would be sideways so id doesn't make sense that the side of the bolt hole doesn't support it!

So, what's missing? should there be sleeves on the bolts?

I don't know if the thread is any good, I'm thinking of tapping it to a larger thread and drilling out the tensioner to match. Can't understand why the bolt is so long - is it supposed to be holding something else as well?
 

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Which engine are you working on ?
I haven't owned a Tucson but I have done several timing bekts on Hyundai products.

Is it an auto tensioner with a spring tensioner built in ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It's a 2.7 V6 here's; a pic, #3 is the tensioner. You can see the 2 long bolts...

#7 is the pulley, you can see that the tensioner controls the rotation of the pulley bracket. I see that in other V6 engines the bolts are either side, at the top, which makes more sense. But it looks like maybe there were sleeves on the bolts so that they fit the holes - nothing like that on this diag though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Gone quiet here huh?

I just finishing this marathon off, here's my list...

4 Struts
2 Control arms
4 Sway bar links
4 rotors
4 set pads
spark plugs
HT leads
Water pump
Timing Belt Kit Including: Timing pulley, Timing idler, Timing tensioner
Harmonic Balancer
Power steering pump
Brake fluid flush
A/T fluid flush
Power Steering Fluid Flush

and I still have the Transfer case and rear diff. to"service" (change oil!)

Some of this is overkill but I want to start with a "known" quantity. My Hyundai dealer would have done this for me - for around $6,000!

I will get back and write this up in a new thread but in the meantime, if you are looking for tips (problems!) email me or post here.
 

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You are taking the right approach with a truck that you don't have a detailed history of; I generally do the same thing.

Brakes and steering too critical to wait for symptoms or part failure.

Fluid changes glycol diffs, tranny etc the cheapest maint you can do , especially if it prevents towing costs and winter break downs.

Brother inlaw has a Tucson of that vintage, has been very happy with it.

I have never seen 4% moisture in brake fluid; I think 2-3% is considered the max allowable, according to my princess auto battery operated tester.
 
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