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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My 2002 2.4l 4 cylinder was running fine, then it seemed to lose power. I dropped the trannie into neutral and revved the engine. It picked back up and I shifted to drive. It ran for about another 400 yards, then cut off completely. I managed to pull off the road into someone's driveway. I tried to restart it several times, then called the tow company, covered by my insurance. In the 30 to 40 minutes it took the rollback to get there, I tried at least 10 more times to start the vehicle. It would not even fire.

The tow truck arrived, loaded up my Santa Fe and took me home. When the driver unloaded the vehicle, he tried to start it and it fired right up. Since then, I have started it in the driveway and even drove it a short distance from my home and it runs fine, but now I don't trust it. My son seems to think it is a clogged fuel filter, or malfunctioning fuel pump
 

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My 2002 2.4l 4 cylinder was running fine, then it seemed to lose power. I dropped the trannie into neutral and revved the engine. It picked back up and I shifted to drive. It ran for about another 400 yards, then cut off completely. I managed to pull off the road into someone's driveway. I tried to restart it several times, then called the tow company, covered by my insurance. In the 30 to 40 minutes it took the rollback to get there, I tried at least 10 more times to start the vehicle. It would not even fire.

The tow truck arrived, loaded up my Santa Fe and took me home. When the driver unloaded the vehicle, he tried to start it and it fired right up. Since then, I have started it in the driveway and even drove it a short distance from my home and it runs fine, but now I don't trust it. My son seems to think it is a clogged fuel filter, or malfunctioning fuel pump
A bad CPS(crankshaft postion sensor) is much more likely. Unfortunately it costs pretty much what a timing belt change to do it. If you had the 2.7 it would have been much easier. A lot of people do their water pump while doing the timing belt, but the CPS makes just as much sense.
 

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Scan for DTC.. your description leads to an aged/bum crank position sensor..

To replace, you'll want :

- Crank Position Sensor
- Timing belt
- Balance shaft belt
- Alternator belt
- A/C-> P/S belt
- Hydraulic tensioner (do not re-use old part)
 

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I am curious why you say to change the timing belt when replacing the CPS. Or is this simply preventative maintenance while you're in there? I thought you can replace the CPS without having to actually remove the belt itself.
 

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Some pics of the job -










Make sure the harness is properly routed, or belt will cut it right quickly.. ask me how I know that..
 

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If you are paying 2 hours labor to remove all the covers and crank pulley to access the CPS sensor; makes sense if the vehicle is in good shape , to make sure you are not going in behind the timing covers again, any time soon.

Depending on milage, maybe even water pump replacement might make sense. Waiting for something to break, then fixing it is not always the cheapest method of car maintenance.
 

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I concur about the Crankshaft Positioning Sensor. I've had this happen 3 times on the different Hyundai Santa Fe's I've owned. They all happen exactly as you describe...just sudden dying of the vehicle. Won't start and after cool-down will start again, but usually dies after warming up.

The location and wire routing of the CPS is brutal in the 2.4L Santa Fe's and as others have said it's the same amount of work to get at it as it is to change out your timing belt and the other belits and things in there, so while you have it all opented up it is good preventative maintenance.
 
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