Are turbo engines generally reliable? - Hyundai Forums : Hyundai Forum
 12Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 05:09 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Texas
2016 Tucson Limited
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Colonel Travis is an unknown quantity at this point
(Thread Starter)
Are turbo engines generally reliable?

We just bought the 2016 Limited. My father in law is a car nut, he refuses to buy anything with a turbo engine because he said that at some point they all will ultimately start to leak and they're a PITA. Actually, he's a BMW freak and I think he's saying this because there were problems with certain BMW models, maybe it was just one year or a small range of years, I don't know. Anyway, in general are turbos ultimately problematic?
Colonel Travis is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 05:22 PM
Senior Member
 
Old's Cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Loco Boy Makes Good
2005 Scion tC; 1988 Toyota Supra; 2009 Hyundai Accent Wheezer 1.6; 96 Subaru Outback (soon)
Posts: 11,271
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Quoted: 3123 Post(s)
Old's Cool is an unknown quantity at this point
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel Travis View Post
We just bought the 2016 Limited. My father in law is a car nut, he refuses to buy anything with a turbo engine because he said that at some point they all will ultimately start to leak and they're a PITA. Actually, he's a BMW freak and I think he's saying this because there were problems with certain BMW models, maybe it was just one year or a small range of years, I don't know. Anyway, in general are turbos ultimately problematic?

Interesting, I was thinking of this today when I saw a Veloster, which is an awesome looking piece hobbled by a 1.6L engine. In the Sport model they make up for it by putting in a turbo.

I'm approaching 60 (faster than I would like to) and because of memories of friends who had turbo engined cars avoid them like the Plague. While the state of the art of turbos is a lot better than it was, the lubricating system, as you hinted, is the weak point in the system. Poor lubrication=cooked bearings=a lot of money to repair your turbo.

If it blows in the first 10 years/100,000 miles I'm sure it would be covered under the warranty, but if you sold it the new owner would eat the cost after 60,000 miles.

I would rather have displacement. So it's costs a little more in fuel. If the engine is designed correctly you'll have fewer problems with a larger-displacement engine made to produce the power.
Tiger-Heli and dougmcp like this.

Do you know any satisfying profanity?!


There are two ways to slide easily through life: believe everything, or doubt everything. Both ways save us from thinking-Fred C. Dobbs

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
<<click...

2009 Accent Hatch
I find it works well enough to get me from one planet to another.

Old's Cool is offline  
post #3 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 05:24 PM
Senior Member
 
AUTOSPARK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Scotland, UK.
Hyundai Getz 1.5 CRD (D4FA)
Posts: 6,217
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Quoted: 1080 Post(s)
AUTOSPARK is an unknown quantity at this point
Turbo engines are just like every other type of engine. They become problematic if they aren't maintained properly. More than 50% of all new cars sold here in the UK now have turbo charged engines and that number is increasing every year. If they were that problematic I doubt they would be so popular here.
Red Raspberry likes this.
AUTOSPARK is offline  
 
post #4 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 05:47 PM
Senior Member
 
Old's Cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Loco Boy Makes Good
2005 Scion tC; 1988 Toyota Supra; 2009 Hyundai Accent Wheezer 1.6; 96 Subaru Outback (soon)
Posts: 11,271
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Quoted: 3123 Post(s)
Old's Cool is an unknown quantity at this point
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by AUTOSPARK View Post
Turbo engines are just like every other type of engine. They become problematic if they aren't maintained properly. More than 50% of all new cars sold here in the UK now have turbo charged engines and that number is increasing every year. If they were that problematic I doubt they would be so popular here.

Yeah, but you guys also pay megabucks (megapounds???) for gas. USA is still the land of (not quite so expensive) cheap gas.

Do you know any satisfying profanity?!


There are two ways to slide easily through life: believe everything, or doubt everything. Both ways save us from thinking-Fred C. Dobbs

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
<<click...

2009 Accent Hatch
I find it works well enough to get me from one planet to another.

Old's Cool is offline  
post #5 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 05:54 PM
Senior Member
 
AUTOSPARK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Scotland, UK.
Hyundai Getz 1.5 CRD (D4FA)
Posts: 6,217
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Quoted: 1080 Post(s)
AUTOSPARK is an unknown quantity at this point
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old's Cool View Post
Yeah, but you guys also pay megabucks (megapounds???) for gas. USA is still the land of (not quite so expensive) cheap gas.
And how does the cost of fuel effect the reliability of the turbo?
AUTOSPARK is offline  
post #6 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 06:09 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: krum, texas
drives first 2016 elantra value edition, windy sea blue. 2016 elantra value edition, galactic gray
Posts: 795
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Quoted: 303 Post(s)
hochiinn is an unknown quantity at this point
i've owned several turbo cars. 1970 bmw 2002, 73 2002(aftermarket bolt on kits), 1988 mazda 323gt, 88 gtx, 91 mitsu galant vr4, 93 gsx. last 2 were mazda millenia, 2.3 miller cycle(supercharger), not quite a turbo, but close. only the bmw's were not water cooled. a factory fi car is well prepared for longevity. stuff like stronger rods, bearings, pins. specially designed pistons, oil squirters, the list goes on. i changed several turbos, none for failure, always upgrading to a bigger one. like tim allen used to say, "MORE POWER" ARGH, ARGH, ARGH. the bmw 3 series cars with twin turbos put out like 300ft/lbs of torque at 1200 rpm. turbos put out TORQUE. the mitsu's were awd, and with a good launch, they would LEAP across the intersection. i loved to the first at the intersection. then my wife caught me, and now all i got is a 1.8 na. actually, she has 2 cars, but i get to drive one of them occasionally. like everything else, depends on the owner. if you just put in gas and go, dont get one
hochiinn is offline  
post #7 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 07:45 PM
Member
 
josedebardi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Dorset, UK
Drives Audi RS3 and Hyundai Tucson
Posts: 76
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
josedebardi is an unknown quantity at this point
Garage
I've only every owned turbocharged cars and never had a single problem with the turbos.

The thing that fails on modern cars is the electronics, 4/5 problems I've had in the last 5 years (8 cars all from brand new across 4 brands BMW, Audi, Skoda, Hyundai) have been related to sensors or other electrical gremlins.

I've come to the conclusion that modern vehicles are only to be owned under warranty as when something goes wrong it's always either;
Difficult to diagnose due to complexity
And/Or
Expensive to fix due to complexity

Turbo should be the last of your worries IMO.

I can count on one hand the number of people I know that have had a blown turbo in the last 20 years. Given I run a local car club (all sorts of different cars) I'd say that's a good record. All the ones that have blown have been on old cars with over 100k miles on them.

I'm also pretty sure the number of cars sold in U.K./Europe with a turbo is much more than 50% now. In 2014 more than 50% of cars sold in the U.K. we're diesel and 95% of those will be turbocharged. A large number of petrol cars are also turbocharged so making up more than 50% overall. More recently the stats show small capacity turbocharged petrol cars are pushing back and the swing is now in favour of petrol overall BECAUSE of the turbocharger making petrol more efficient. Because of emissions laws related to diesel become so restrictive expect to see 150bhp 1.0L 3-cylinder turbo engines the norm for smaller cars and 300bhp 1.6L turbo/hybrid engines becoming the norm in executive/sport vehicles. In the USA this will take a lot longer to take hold due to the afore mentioned 'pretty much free' gas prices! But all of this adds up to the turbo being a very well used and reliable component!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
mellobob likes this.

Hers - Polar White Hyundai Tucson Premium SE 2.0 CRDi Auto
His -
Panther Black Audi RS3
Sold -
Morning Blue Hyundai i10 Premium SE 1.2 Manual

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
josedebardi is offline  
post #8 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 10:05 PM
Senior Member
 
ferlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: St Louis, Mo
Drives 2016 Tucson Limited/AWD/Ultimate Build Date: Oct 27, 2015
Posts: 124
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
ferlin is an unknown quantity at this point
Quote:
Originally Posted by AUTOSPARK View Post
And how does the cost of fuel effect the reliability of the turbo?
It doesn't. You'll have to excuse us here across the pond. Obviously the fumes from all this cheap fuel has fried our brains.

Last edited by ferlin; 12-28-2016 at 10:09 PM.
ferlin is offline  
post #9 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 10:24 PM
Member
 
jfranklin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Brookside, NS, Canada
Drives 2015 Tucson GL Past: '11 Elantra, '04 Dodge Ram 1500, '98 Toyota Corolla
Posts: 54
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
jfranklin is an unknown quantity at this point
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old's Cool View Post
Interesting, I was thinking of this today when I saw a Veloster, which is an awesome looking piece hobbled by a 1.6L engine. In the Sport model they make up for it by putting in a turbo.

I'm approaching 60 (faster than I would like to) and because of memories of friends who had turbo engined cars avoid them like the Plague. While the state of the art of turbos is a lot better than it was, the lubricating system, as you hinted, is the weak point in the system. Poor lubrication=cooked bearings=a lot of money to repair your turbo.

If it blows in the first 10 years/100,000 miles I'm sure it would be covered under the warranty, but if you sold it the new owner would eat the cost after 60,000 miles.

I would rather have displacement. So it's costs a little more in fuel. If the engine is designed correctly you'll have fewer problems with a larger-displacement engine made to produce the power.
I have to say I agree - I'd rather a larger engine without the turbo. Of course having small turbocharged engines for fuel efficiency is better than having small under powered engines without the turbos... I'm also very curious about the long-term reliability of these cars, since this trend is becoming more prevalent.

Or to put it another way, what kind of extra maintenance is required to keep a turbocharged engine happy into high mileage? (well past any warranty)

As to the complexity of electronic systems and the failure of those systems, to me it's a fine argument to keep automotive electronics to a minimum or at least design them to be (relatively) simple and easy-to-repair. There's not much incentive for manufacturers to do that, but it would be possible.
Old's Cool likes this.
jfranklin is offline  
post #10 of 43 (permalink) Old 12-28-2016, 11:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: USA
Drives 2016 Tucson Eco AWD
Posts: 404
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
gggplaya is an unknown quantity at this point
To clarify. The fuel itself is about the same price as in the U.S. It's the taxes that are killing you.

The UK pays about 0.57 pounds per liter just in tax, which is about $2.68 per gallon in taxes.

Earlier today, i paid $2.29 per gallon total with taxes included here in the U.S. They pay more in tax, then we pay for tax and fuel combined. It's about 0.33 pounds per liter for the actual fuel in the UK, that's about $1.50 per gallon which is about what we're paying in the u.s.

Last edited by gggplaya; 12-28-2016 at 11:20 PM.
gggplaya is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Hyundai Forums : Hyundai Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome