Brake Bleeding - Hyundai Forums : Hyundai Forum

Register Home Forums Active Topics Photo Gallery Garage Members List Calendar Auto Loans Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Auto EscrowInsurance

Hyundai-Forums.com is the premier Hyundai Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-25-2011, 12:33 PM   #1 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bay Area, California
Drives 2007 Sonata GLS (2.4L engine) Deep water Blue
Posts: 9
nicer20
Default Brake Bleeding

Hi All,

I have a 2007 Sonata that I bought Jan 2007. It now has 44000 Miles on it and is 57 months old.

What is the recommended brake fluid change interval ?

Is there any write up on how to bleed brakes on this Sonata ?

Is standard brake bleeding method recommended or are there special precautions (due to ABS etc.) that need to be followed ?

Thanks in advance,

NG

(Tags : Brakes, Brake Fluid, Brake Bleeding, Brake Fluid change/replacement)
nicer20 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-25-2011, 02:27 PM   #2 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USA - Montana
2008 Sonata 3.3 LTD 2010 Dodge Ram 1500 Hemi 1995 Ford Taurus GL 2009 Sonata 2.4 GLS
Posts: 290
ken99 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

The maintenance schedule in the 2007 Sonata owners manual specifies inspection of the fluid (the fluid level) every 30K miles, but doesn't specify replacement at any time per se. I replace the fluid when I service the brake pads and rotors on my cars. I use a hand vacuum pump with a catch tank to remove the old fluid and suck new fluid through the lines. The vacuum line attaches to the bleeder valve on the caliper slave. The trick is to keep the master cylinder reservoir full of clean fluid. More than once I've had to start over by forgetting to do so. I have not yet had to touch the brakes on either the 2008 or 2009 Sonata in the family.
ken99 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-25-2011, 02:48 PM   #3 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Negative 1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC
Drives: 2008 Sonata GLS, 2.4L, AT
Posts: 332
Negative 1 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

As ken99 mentions, Hyundai has no brake fluid replacement interval, only "inspection". Irrespective of that, I replace the brake fluid every 30K miles. This is what I've seen recommended in my Chilton manual for the Sonata, and in a few other places I can't remember.

I've tried a couple different methods of bleeding the Sonata, but by far my preferred method to date is using the Motive 0107 bleeder. It's not exactly cheap but when using the Motive, I didn't have to worry about the master cylinder running too low (which happened to me--despite my trying to avoid it--when I used vacuum bleeding).

If you do buy a Motive bleeder, I strongly recommend that you buy some cheap (e.g. store brand) brake fluid just to use for rinsing the tank and tubes out before you use it the first time.

The Hyundai-recommended bleeding order for the 2007 Sonata (I got this off hmaservice.com, though the Chilton manual says the same thing) is:

1. Rear Right
2. Front Left
3. Rear Left
4. Front Right

If the existing brake fluid is old, it's probably much darker than new fluid, and during the bleeding process, it will be easy to tell when you've removed all the old fluid out of each line as you go around.

You'll need a 10-mm wrench for the bleeder screws.
Negative 1 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-25-2011, 08:07 PM   #4 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
hoby2hq2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Upstate NY
2011 Sonata 2.0T Limited
Posts: 275
hoby2hq2 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

Here is my method - not the best way, but effective:

1. Try to replace the fluid & bleed the brakes yourself
2. F-up your replacing / brake bleeding job
3. Drive your car to the nearest garage with no brakes
4. Pay the garage $70
5. Drive away with new fluid and bled brakes

__________________
Old Garage: 2009 Sonata 2.4; 1999 Grand Cherokee 4.0; 1999 300m 3.5; 1994 Firebird 3.4; 1995 Beretta 2.2; 1989 Grand AM 2.5
hoby2hq2 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-25-2011, 08:12 PM   #5 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Negative 1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC
Drives: 2008 Sonata GLS, 2.4L, AT
Posts: 332
Negative 1 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

I screwed up my first time around (I let air get into the line). But then I installed my head on straight and carried it out with no problems. I simply don't trust some shop to do the work, to do it properly, and not to damage anything in the process.
Negative 1 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2011, 01:53 PM   #6 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: NJ
Posts: 106
RobRiguez is on a distinguished road
Default

General consensus is every 2 years regardless of miles. Brake fluid absorbs moisture from the air and over time this can cause the fluid to not provide as much pressure as it should. Brake fluid should be a very very light yellow/tan/beer color. Anything darker should be replaced as soon as you can (but its not an emergency as long as your brakes are still functioning properly).

There are many methods to properly bleeding the brakes. The way I have always done it is:

-Buy 2-3 brand new small bottles of the proper fluid (about a pint each).
-Use a $.99 turkey baster to remove as much of the old fluid as possible from the reservoir. Be very careful not to get any of the fluid on any painted surface or there will no longer be any paint there if left for more then a few moments.
-Refill the reservoir almost to the top.
-Remove the rubber cover on the bleeder nipple. If no cover, clean the nipple very well.
-Have helper in the drivers seat lightly pressing on the brake pedal and using either a 3/8" or 10mm closed end wrench, slightly open the bleeder valve until fluid starts to come out. Before the pedal hits the floor, close the valve and have helper release foot from pedal.
-Repeat this until fluid is clean and clear, this can be anywhere from 15-30 pumps depending on the car and which wheel you are doing.
-Make sure to close valve before the pedal hits the floor and you are less likely to introduce air to the system.
-REMEMBER TO ADD MORE FLUID to the reservoir before moving to the next wheel.
-With practice and a good helper, you should be able to do all 4 wheels in less than an hour. I've done it in as little as 20 min when I've already had the car up on jack stands and all 4 wheels off to begin with.

2 big potential problems with doing this yourself...other than air in the lines.
-If you are not careful, do not use proper tools, or have VERY rusty bleeder valves, you can brake one off easily. If this happens, unless you are VERY familiar with drilling/tapping, I would highly recommend biting the bullet and buying a new caliper at this point.
-If you have a high mileage older car and, you or your helper allow the pedal to hit the floor, you can damage the plunger and have squishy/less powerfull brakes from now on. If this happens and your brakes now suck (and you have confirmed that there is NO air in the lines) its now time to replace your master cylinder as well.

Last edited by RobRiguez; 09-26-2011 at 04:03 PM.
RobRiguez is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2011, 03:56 PM   #7 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Negative 1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC
Drives: 2008 Sonata GLS, 2.4L, AT
Posts: 332
Negative 1 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobRiguez View Post
General consensus is every 2 years regardless of miles.
I agree with this. I've just looked into it and lots of auto makers recommend either 24- or 36-month change intervals. I double checked the Chilton manual, and it actually says 30K miles or 36 months. I will revise my maintenance to simply change it every 24 months. Brakes is not the part of the car to go lazy or cheap with. Thanks for the info.
Negative 1 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-28-2011, 02:10 PM   #8 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bay Area, California
Drives 2007 Sonata GLS (2.4L engine) Deep water Blue
Posts: 9
nicer20
Default

Thanks everyone for all their responses. I don't have brake problem and the fluid color is still good but I will try to do it ASAP since the vehicle is already nearing 5 yrs.

Thanks to Negative1 for wheel sequence and wrench size.
Thanks to Robriguez for detailed write up.
@Eric07: I myself had trouble searching for threads on this topic. It is a good idea to add tags so that everyone benefits from searches. I hope we continue that practice.

Again, thanks everyone for help and support.

NG
nicer20 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2012, 02:30 PM   #9 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
hoby2hq2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Upstate NY
2011 Sonata 2.0T Limited
Posts: 275
hoby2hq2 is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

bumping an old thread...how did things turn out?

I was looking at making a pressurized tank with the garden sprayer and a replacement master cylinder cap. Then I thought about using a syringe to just suck out the old fluid at the bleeder...would this work or am I over looking something? I Googled it and everything come up using syringe to force fluid in at the bleeder and force air out. But if you just want to flush clean fluid in, wouldn't you fill new fluid on top and use a syringe to suck out at the bleeder? Should not let air in if you grease around the bleeder and would be simple I think...
__________________
Old Garage: 2009 Sonata 2.4; 1999 Grand Cherokee 4.0; 1999 300m 3.5; 1994 Firebird 3.4; 1995 Beretta 2.2; 1989 Grand AM 2.5
hoby2hq2 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2012, 08:17 PM   #10 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Maryland
Drives 07 Sonata GLS 2.4 13 Sonata GLS 2.4
Posts: 179
Partner is an unknown quantity at this point
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hoby2hq2 View Post
bumping an old thread...how did things turn out?

I was looking at making a pressurized tank with the garden sprayer and a replacement master cylinder cap. Then I thought about using a syringe to just suck out the old fluid at the bleeder...would this work or am I over looking something? I Googled it and everything come up using syringe to force fluid in at the bleeder and force air out. But if you just want to flush clean fluid in, wouldn't you fill new fluid on top and use a syringe to suck out at the bleeder? Should not let air in if you grease around the bleeder and would be simple I think...
Just got buy a vacuum brake flusher to attach to bleeder. Pretty cheap.
Partner is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hyundai Forums : Hyundai Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Random Question


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:44 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0
Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.