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Old 08-13-2005, 05:45 PM   #1 (permalink)
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PeteCal
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My son just purchased a 2005 Elantra. We upgraded the audio unit. This is what we did. I hope it can be useful to others.

The car came with just a cassette player and my son wanted a CD player that played CD/R and CD/RW recorded in both mp3 and wma format. He also wanted to play his mp3 player back through the head unit if possible. We found the Dual XDM6820 from Crutchfield.com. It does all the above and has an mp3 "dongle" on a 40" interface cable. The dongle has a standard "headphone" jack to plug in an mp3 player. It is priced at $99.99 plus $12.99 for the wire harness. I planned on ordering it when it showed up at Best Buy for $10 less. We whipped over and picked one up. The guy seemed a little ticked when I said we wanted to install it ourselves. He wanted $18.99 for the wire harness. We decided we could do without that.

We pulled the original head unit following the instructions on the Crutchfield site (same as in the Elantra online manual). The picture labeled JustConn.jpg is a shot of the connector on the back of the original head unit. The file PinOut.gif lists the connections to the back of the head unit. I found some pins laying around the house that I thought would fit into the (female) connector in the Elantra. JustPin.jpg is a picture of one along with a mm scale. I soldered the wires that came with the new head unit to the pointy end of these pins and put shrink tubing over the solder joints. PinsIn.jpg is a picture of the pins inserted in the car's connector. If the pins I used prove to maintain a reliable connection over time, I will fill in the connector with a glue gun the next time we open the dash.

A few days later I was wandering through Wal-Mart and I spotted the section where they have various wiring harnesses. They didn't have any for the Elantra but I did spot a few that had the same style pins for about $7.00. I am sure the plastic shell of the connector would not match the Elantra but the shell could be cut away and the individual pins used like I used JustPin.jpg. That would be a better fit than what I used.

As for the mp3 dongle, we wanted to mount it where the mp3 player was accessible but also hidden. We opted for the little compartment to the left of the steering wheel. The flip down one that hides the fuse box. While the dash board was still out, we inserted the dongle between two protrusions on the top of the fuse box. It has a sticky back and between that and wedging it between the protrusions it is very secure and shouldn't cause any rattles. We routed its wire over the steering column, behind the instrument panel to the head unit.

To connect the mp3 dongle to the mp3 player, we made a cable with audio jacks on each end by getting two headphone sets from the dollar store, clipping off the head phones and soldering the left to left, right to right, and ground to ground and ground to ground. One end we plugged in permanently to the dongle because once the dash is back in, that connection will not be accessible. The rest of the cable and the end are stuffed in the compartment.

As for mounting the head unit, it came with a "box" that the instructions said should be mounted in the opening and then the head unit should be slid into the box. Well we did a lot of thinking and fitting and decided we didn't needed the box. The Elantra head unit has a bracket on each side with two screws holes to mount to the car. The brackets also extend downward and are screwed to that "tray" below the head unit. The tray has a screw hole on each side to mount to the car also.

Those brackets are connected to the head unit by a flat head screw on each side. Luckily, the new head unit had a screw hole on each side that was positioned in exactly the same place as on the original head unit. Note, to see these holes we had to remove two little plates that are screwed to the sides of the new head unit. The screws were the wrong size but is seems that the new head unit screw holes accepted #10-32 screws. The new head unit has a stamp on the side that indicates that any screws going into the side of the unit should be shorter than 6 mm. We cut down a couple of #10-32 flat head screws and mounted the brackets and tray to the new head unit. It fit perfectly in the old hole. No gaps, protrudes just right. We didn't even need the snap on cowling that came with the new unit.
See DoneLowRes.jpg
Testing it, it sounds fine, no noise or pickup from the home made audio cable.

Hope this helps

PeteCal.

<Edit> (1) Wish I could correct the typo in the title.
(2) I see the picture titles don't show so, in order across the bottom, they are:
JustConn.jpg
PinOut.gif
JustPin.jpg
PinsIn.jpg
DoneLowRes.jpg
Attached Images
File Type: jpg JustConn.jpg (28.5 KB, 563 views)
File Type: gif PinOut.gif (17.4 KB, 550 views)
File Type: jpg JustPin.jpg (23.8 KB, 308 views)
File Type: jpg PinsIn.jpg (50.0 KB, 359 views)
File Type: jpg DoneLowRes.jpg (169.6 KB, 670 views)
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Old 08-17-2005, 12:58 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Thanks for the post. I have an '05 Elantra GT and am not satisfied with the power output from the OEM radio. When I crank it up all the way, usually on the highway with the windows down, I think about needing/getting an aftermarket head unit. I haven't been at all concerned about wiring it as I am getting the console apart without breaking something. As soon as a complete official OEM service manual is available- not the haynes types..the real deal ones that the dealers use- I was going to buy one and install a radio then. If you can give me some pointers on getting that dash apart though..I'd be fairly inclined to go ahead and slap one in. Any advice?

Also..how does that nice new radio sound through the OEM speakers? Any good?? Worth the investment to upgrade the head unit?
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Old 08-17-2005, 02:22 PM   #3 (permalink)
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No need to wait for an manual. Hyundai made the whole thing available at:

http://www.hmaservice.com

You have to register and make a name for your "garage". Everything you need (just about) including how to remove the dash. Go to the Service Information section

Also, go to crutchfield.com and flounder around. You will find essentially the same drawing for dash removal but at better resolution.

As for how it sounds. I have no idea. My son is the one into music. As far as I am concerned, "entertainers" are a blight on society. They get treated like they invented a cure for cancer but they really are the cancer.

Sorry for editorializing.

Hope my info helped.

PeteC
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Old 08-18-2005, 01:37 PM   #4 (permalink)
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A tip regarding access to the online shop manual: I have heard about people that had trouble with the registration. When I registered, everything appeared to work fine, but they say they will email you a password and it never came. If this happens to you, go back and click on the Forgot Password link; right after that, my password arrived and I can see everything.

I don't even own an Elantra but am researching what my next car will be. The fact that Hyundai shares all their shop data an technical service bulletins for free is a nice touch I wish more manufacturers would do. As they are the only ones I am aware of that do it, along with the excellent support on this and other online forums and mail lists, it makes me lean toward buying the Hyundai.
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Old 08-18-2005, 10:54 PM   #5 (permalink)
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That online manual was a major factor in purchasing the Elantra. I have the paper manual for my Isuzu Trooper. It cost over $100 US but I made it part of the purchase deal. I also bought the CD version for my Ford Van, again over $100. (Both are available from Helm; order online. They are the same ones that the dealer uses.)

I like paper better except for the search capability. Unfortunately the Ford CD has a crappy search.

The Hyundai manual is great and the search function works great also.

I built a scantool using the chip from scantool.net. With that and all the trouble shooting info based on the DTCs (Device Trouble Codes) in the manual, I feel really great about the Elantra.

PeteC
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Old 08-19-2005, 10:09 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
[b]That online manual was a major factor in purchasing the Elantra.
It's definitely influencing me that way. In fact, based on online support (forums, mail lists and the Hyundai online data), the Elantra is now at the top of my list for the car I plan to buy this fall.

Quote:
[b]I built a scantool using the chip from scantool.net. With that and all the trouble shooting info based on the DTCs (Device Trouble Codes) in the manual, I feel really great about the Elantra.
I was going to ask, but I don't think I have to: You're an engineer!

If/when I buy an Elantra, I may want to talk to you about how you did that so I can build one too. It would be a great thing to post to the forum (if it isn't here yet).
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Old 08-21-2005, 12:00 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Yep, engineer, electrical.

As for the scantool. It isn't unique to Hyundai. Every new vehicle sold in the US since 1997 is required to be OBDII (On Board Diagnostics #2) compliant. You can google for scantool or OBDII and get more information than you can decipher.

I can give you a little overview. This is from memory and may be a little obsolete and perhaps have a mistake or two.

The EPA dictated that vehicles conform to one of three standards:
PWM--- Mostly Ford
VPW--- Mostly GM (but my Isuzu uses VPW)
ISO--- Mostly Chrysler and "imports"

There may also be a new standard, CAN but all I know is the name. Hyundai seems to be ISO.

The standard specifies what conditions (mostly emissions) that set the Check Engine light or more precisely, the MIL (Malfunction Indicator Light). Also what additional details of the problem must be reported. These are DTCs (Device Trouble Codes). If you have a scantool you can plug it into the OBDII connector which is pecified to be "near the drivers seat". Then read out the DTC number(s). Then go to the Hyundai manual, under the fuel or transmission section and find your DTC #. You'll find the troubleshooting chart to follow to fix the problem.

Unfortunately, once the manufacturers added the computer and OBDII connector, they also added a lot more codes. These are proprietary and it cost big bucks to buy it from the manufacturers. If you knew these, you could do all kinds of interesting stuff like change the door lock codes, troubleshoot the ABS and Air bag system, etc.

You can buy scantools from $100 up to $1000s. The expensive ones should know more of the manufacturers codes because the makers paid for the extra info.

I choose to build my own using the chips from scantool.net. They are about $15 each (times three systems , I need all three) but require a computer to control and display the results. Most people use a notebook computer but I use my Pocket PC. I wrote the program and it is available for free download from the scantool.net site as is their notebook program and some other downloads. I just wanted to do the troubleshooting. Lots of these programs do more stuff like "Digital Dashboard" that displays stuff like RPM, oxygen in exhaust, etc. That is the advantage of using the chip to build your own. Lots of info on the scantool.net site and they have a good forum.

Hope this helps.

PeteCal





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Old 08-21-2005, 05:48 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Wow, that's cool. I have Fords right now. if I buy a Hyundai I guess I would need two. I don't have a laptop, but I arn writing this post frorn a PDA at a hotel so I obviously have one of those.

btw I see you're in Buffalo. I'm from Cheektowaga originally.
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Old 08-23-2005, 02:49 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I lived there for a year. Then 4 years in Alden. Now in Amherst for 27 years. If the county wasn't bankrupt and the state ruledby NYC, this would be a great place ot live.

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Old 04-23-2011, 07:11 AM   #10 (permalink)
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QUOTE (PeteCal @ Aug 13 2005, 05:45 PM)
Quote:
My son just purchased a 2005 Elantra. We upgraded the audio unit. This is what we did. I hope it can be useful to others.

The car came with just a cassette player and my son wanted a CD player that played CD/R and CD/RW recorded in both mp3 and wma format. He also wanted to play his mp3 player back through the head unit if possible. We found the Dual XDM6820 from Crutchfield.com. It does all the above and has an mp3 "dongle" on a 40" interface cable. The dongle has a standard "headphone" jack to plug in an mp3 player. It is priced at $99.99 plus $12.99 for the wire harness. I planned on ordering it when it showed up at Best Buy for $10 less. We whipped over and picked one up. The guy seemed a little ticked when I said we wanted to install it ourselves. He wanted $18.99 for the wire harness. We decided we could do without that.

We pulled the original head unit following the instructions on the Crutchfield site (same as in the Elantra online manual). The picture labeled JustConn.jpg is a shot of the connector on the back of the original head unit. The file PinOut.gif lists the connections to the back of the head unit. I found some pins laying around the house that I thought would fit into the (female) connector in the Elantra. JustPin.jpg is a picture of one along with a mm scale. I soldered the wires that came with the new head unit to the pointy end of these pins and put shrink tubing over the solder joints. PinsIn.jpg is a picture of the pins inserted in the car's connector. If the pins I used prove to maintain a reliable connection over time, I will fill in the connector with a glue gun the next time we open the dash.

A few days later I was wandering through Wal-Mart and I spotted the section where they have various wiring harnesses. They didn't have any for the Elantra but I did spot a few that had the same style pins for about $7.00. I am sure the plastic shell of the connector would not match the Elantra but the shell could be cut away and the individual pins used like I used JustPin.jpg. That would be a better fit than what I used.

As for the mp3 dongle, we wanted to mount it where the mp3 player was accessible but also hidden. We opted for the little compartment to the left of the steering wheel. The flip down one that hides the fuse box. While the dash board was still out, we inserted the dongle between two protrusions on the top of the fuse box. It has a sticky back and between that and wedging it between the protrusions it is very secure and shouldn't cause any rattles. We routed its wire over the steering column, behind the instrument panel to the head unit.

To connect the mp3 dongle to the mp3 player, we made a cable with audio jacks on each end by getting two headphone sets from the dollar store, clipping off the head phones and soldering the left to left, right to right, and ground to ground and ground to ground. One end we plugged in permanently to the dongle because once the dash is back in, that connection will not be accessible. The rest of the cable and the end are stuffed in the compartment.

As for mounting the head unit, it came with a "box" that the instructions said should be mounted in the opening and then the head unit should be slid into the box. Well we did a lot of thinking and fitting and decided we didn't needed the box. The Elantra head unit has a bracket on each side with two screws holes to mount to the car. The brackets also extend downward and are screwed to that "tray" below the head unit. The tray has a screw hole on each side to mount to the car also.

Those brackets are connected to the head unit by a flat head screw on each side. Luckily, the new head unit had a screw hole on each side that was positioned in exactly the same place as on the original head unit. Note, to see these holes we had to remove two little plates that are screwed to the sides of the new head unit. The screws were the wrong size but is seems that the new head unit screw holes accepted #10-32 screws. The new head unit has a stamp on the side that indicates that any screws going into the side of the unit should be shorter than 6 mm. We cut down a couple of #10-32 flat head screws and mounted the brackets and tray to the new head unit. It fit perfectly in the old hole. No gaps, protrudes just right. We didn't even need the snap on cowling that came with the new unit.
See DoneLowRes.jpg
Testing it, it sounds fine, no noise or pickup from the home made audio cable.

Hope this helps

PeteCal.

<Edit> (1) Wish I could correct the typo in the title.
(2) I see the picture titles don't show so, in order across the bottom, they are:
JustConn.jpg
PinOut.gif
JustPin.jpg
PinsIn.jpg
DoneLowRes.jpg


Should there be extra wires? I had to manually install my new stereo because the wires were stripped from the previous radio and now my constant power source is messed up. I connected all of the wires in the diagram to the new radio, but there are extra wires and the added problem. What should I do? Where should I put the extra wires or which other wires should I hook them up to?
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